Day 6 – St. Peter’s in Chains, Campidoglio

Thursday, we were all a little tired from packing so much into each day, so we decided to have a solo day and only do a couple things; each of us went to separate parts of the city and saw a few quick things of interest. I decided to check out the St. Peter in Chains church near the Colesseum and Michelangelo’s Campidoglio down the road.

St. Peter's chains

St. Peter's chains

St. Peter had a problem with getting caught; he got locked up two times, and these are the two chains which, when they were brought together hundreds of years later, miraculously clinked together.

Michelangelo's Moses

Michelangelo's Moses

Nowadays, this is what everyone comes here to see. This giant partial facade was comissioned by the Pope as his sarcoffigus, but just after starting, the same Pope changed his mind and ordered  Mike to do the Sistine Ceiling. When the Pope died, shortly thereafter, there was no more funding for this project, so it remains very incomplete. Moses, seated in lower the center, is the masterpiece; a combination of at rest and tenseness, he is preparing to repremand the Israelites for worshipping the golden calf and has the ten commandments under his arm. None of the close-ups showed well because it was so dark in the church, unfortunately.

Michelangelo's Campidoglio

Michelangelo's Campidoglio

Michelangelo’s Campidoglio was down the street fifteen minutes and up a steep staircase, also designed by him, in Piazza Venezia. This is a statue of Constantine on a horse, converting people…but not really. It’s actually Marcus Aurelius, but was mistaken for Constantine, so it was one of the few pre-Christianity statues to survive.

Later in the evening, we went across the river to the Testacchio district, which is apparently the club district. And we drank and danced. Night over.

Advertisements

Day 5 – Uffizi, Inside Il Duomo, David, Ponte Vecchio

Day 5 began the usual way: our reservations at the Uffizi were for 11:15am and we woke up at 11:30am. So we hustled down the river towards the museum, grabbing a panini for some nourishment before tackling one of the worlds greatest art galleries. We entered 45 minutes late, luckily without a problem, and got started going through the 42+ rooms. The first most notable room was Botticelli’s; on display were the “Venus” and the “Primavera” (there were no photos allowed, so these are poor quality).
Bottcelli's Primavera

Bottcelli's Primavera

 

Botticelli's Venus

Botticelli's Venus

One of the next rooms had three of Leonardo’s, and when I attempted to take a picture of the Adoration of the Magi, I got yelled at, so there are no more pictures from the Uffizi. However, the Da Vincis were great to see, there were also some Raphaels, Caravaggios, a Michelangelo mandorla, Titian’s “Venus,” and some Rubens, among hundreds other artists.

From there, we went back to the Duomo so that we could go in and up to the top. The inside was nice (it’s hard going into any churches after St. Peter’s), Don and Duch decided to go up to the top of the dome for €8, while I stayed courtside. Don got some great video from the top which I’ll post when we’re back – this internet connection is awful.

Inside Il Duomo

Inside Il Duomo

After seeing the inside of the Duomo, we rolled down the road towards Michelangelo’s school, the Galleria dell’Accademia which contains the original plaster mold of the “Rape of the Sabines,” the mold for a sculpture copy of Titian’s painting “Venus of Urbino,” a few plaster molds of Michelangelo’s “Slaves” (intended for his own funeral monument) and the larger-than-life “David.” Photos here were also illegal, but I got a few off without anyone noticing.

Michelangelo's David

Michelangelo's David

We began our march back in search of food, and went across the Ponte Vecchio while it was packed, the gold shops shining brightly.

Ponte Vecchio at night

Ponte Vecchio at night

After a quick bite and a look at some of the coolest gelato we had seen (below), we headed to the train station, bought our tickets, and were back to Rome…

Sweet gelato

Sweet gelato

Day 4 – Firenze

Our plan for today was to get up early, around 9am or 10am, to grab a train to Florence from Termini Station, however, the running theme for us seems to be completely inept at setting alarms, so we woke up around 11:30am, and were on a train by 12pm.

Jed Don Duch en route to Florence

Jed Don Duch en route to Florence

The hour and a half train ride cost €38, the car was actually really nice, and the trip was mostly comprised of sleeping (directly after that picture was taken). When we rolled into downtown Firenze at 1:30pm, it was raining, but not hard enought to stop and see some things before heading off to find our hostel. First, we stopped at the famous Santa Maria Novella, near the train station, which houses a variety of paintings by Giotto, Lippi, and other early Renaissancers, a crusifix by Brunelleschi (who also did Il Duomo), and it’s most famous piece, a fresco by Massacio done in 1427 called the Trinity and is also the first ever experimental use of perspective (!). I tried to take an illegal picture, but unfortunately it turned out too poorly to post here. Google it.

Piazza della Signoria sculpture gallery

Piazza della Signoria sculpture gallery

From there we walked in the diretion of the river, our hostel, and a couple other sites. We walked through the Piazza della Signoria which has a sculpture gallery on the south side (above), a pretty sick neptune statue to the north east, and the Palazzo Vecchio to the south east. The sculpture gallery contains two extra famous pieces: Giambologna’s twisting “Rape of the Sabines” and Cellini’s gory “Perseus” below.

Rape of the Sabines

Rape of the Sabines

Perseus Slaying Medusa

Perseus Slaying Medusa

At this point it was coming down pretty hard, so we decided to hightail it to our hostel to dry off before exploring any more of the city. We walked south through the Uffizi passageway (for a glimpse of what we’d do tomorrow), and east along the river to our apartment for the night at the Riverbank Hostel. Pleasantly surprised, we found the apartment was bigger and nicer than the one we were staying at in Rome, and it was only €13 per night per person. The colors were a little weird though…

Riverbank Hostel room

Riverbank Hostel room We laughed about the keys they gave us. They were straight out of the Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe or Harry Potter. When the owner showed me the biggest one on the lower right, I wanted to be like, "Wow, so we're in Florence, yet we rented a room in Narnia?"Ridiculous room keys

Once the rain had slowed and now that we were dry and refreshed, we ventured out towards the Santa Maria del Fiore, better known as Il Duomo. Truly breathtaking, the Duomo dominates the piazza with the Campanile (bell tower) directly to the south and the Baptistery to the west.

Santa Maria del Fiore aka Il Duomo

Santa Maria del Fiore aka Il Duomo

The Duomo was closed by the time we got there, and we didn’t feel like going into the Baptistery – the famous bronze doors on its east side – Ghiberti’s “Gate of Paradise” depicting scenes from the Old Testiment – were enough to look at. Apparently, there had been a contest between the major sculptors, artists, architects in Italy for the commission of the doors. In the finals, Ghiberti beat out Brunelleschi (the guy that did the freakin Duomo) and set up a shop enlisting other early Renaissancers, like Donatello, to help out with the project. 

Ghiberti's Gates of Paradise

Ghiberti's Gates of Paradise

One of the panels close up

One of the panels close up

We then decided to orient ourselves with the city by going up the Campanile right next to the Duomo for one of Florence’s best views. €6 and about 430 stairs later:

It got tighter than this as it went up...

It got tighter than this as it went up...

Not getting near that railing...

Not getting near that railing...

Duomo from Campanile

Duomo from Campanile

We headed back to find a place to eat, walked around the Ponte Vecchio (it was dark by then, so pictures turned out badly), and made reservations for the Uffizi for 11am tomorrow. We also found a place to go for the night that had a beerpong tournament with the grand prize of a weekend trip to Prague, Berlin, or Amalfi, which neither Don nor Duch found out until after they had won it. Unfortunately, it leaves out of Florence in a couple weeks, and they’d have to pay the airfair there and back; instead, they sold the trip to the girls they beat for €10.